thoughts about software and sensible security.

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Onze digitale veiligheid is geen keuzevak

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Als het aan minister van Engelshoven van onderwijs ligt gaat de overheid zich actief bemoeien met de gebrekkige aandacht voor security aan de ict-opleidingen van het MBO. De Samenwerkingsorganisatie Beroepsonderwijs Bedrijfsleven (SBB) werkt hiertoe aan een herziene standaard, die echter niet voor 2019 van kracht zal zijn.

Het is mooi (zij het rijkelijk laat) dat de sector niet langer toelaat dat zo’n taai en weinig sexy onderwerp als de beveiliging van ons digitale hebben en houwen slechts een keuzevak is. Ik bedoel: hoeveel gruwelverhalen over datalekken zijn er nog nodig voordat het besef komt dat de sector als geheel (niet alleen de scholen) enorme steken laat vallen? Op de korte termijn zal het weinig uitmaken. Voordat de eerste lichting nieuwe afgestudeerden de arbeidsmarkt betreedt zijn we vier jaar verder. (more…)

Security as an afterthought

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I am doing a Coursera course called Usable Security which – as you would expect – is all about improving the security of systems through better usability.

It’s hard to dispel the opinion common among developers that usability and security are somehow inversely proportionate; that rock-solid secure systems are of necessity hard to use, and that improving their usability must degrade their security. Quite the opposite is true in fact. Systems with a large potential for serious damage should be foolproof and that’s where usability comes in. Making them hard to learn only makes them more error-prone. (more…)

Staging a play the agile way

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It’s been roughly two years since I wrote and staged my IT-comedy Fair Trade, which we performed on location for two teams of developers. Great fun it was, and it’s available here if you read Dutch. With all my years of experience in incremental product delivery I was wondering: could you produce a play in monthly sprints, sharing the incremental deliveries with an audience? Spoiler: no, you couldn’t. It’d be torture for everyone involved. It’s waterfall or nothing. (more…)

Taking stock of 18 years in IT. What does it take to make great software?

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This year my IT career is coming of age. In the year 2000, when URLs were still awkwardly pronounced double-you-double-you-double-you-dot, I quit an uneventful tech support job in Edinburgh to code in Perl and DHTML, cursing the incompatibilities between IE and Netscape. But I never regretted the career change. Eighteen years have passed and I’m happier and fitter then I was at age thirty, believe it or not. I thought it would be a fun experiment to rank all major projects and companies I worked with over the years in terms of overall satisfaction (without too much regard to pay or perks). You can make such a list intuitively, but I wanted to formulate the criteria which in my experience make a software project enjoyable and then give marks for each. (more…)

thoughts about software and sensible security.

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Jasper on twitter

Catching thought criminals in Orwell's analogue dictatorship was time-consuming and ineffective. A.I. will fix all… https://t.co/XpzIDondJe
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